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High powered dairy feed.

Dairy producers continue to turn to nutrient-rich, whole cottonseed dairy feed to increase the milk production from America’s 9 million3 dairy cows.

A lactating dairy cow will eat about 50 pounds of food every day.4 But more important than the amount of food they eat is that they get the right kinds of food to keep them healthy.

Whole cottonseed has energy, protein and fiber in greater concentrations than many other feedstuffs. That’s why it’s recognized by dairy producers nationwide as a cost-effective premier diet supplement for lactating cows. Producers have found that a few pounds of whole cottonseed per day, per cow is ideal for mixing with less nutrient-dense feed ingredients.

Cottonseed has been in use as a cattle feed supplement for more than a century5, but usage increased in the 1990s6, boosted by new research and outreach to dairy producers. When corn and soybean prices became increasingly volatile after 2010, the dairy producer market responded with further increases in whole cottonseed orders. In fact, more than 50% of the annual supply of whole cottonseed is consumed by dairy cattle.

This is just one example of how The Cotton Research & Promotion Program is discovering innovative ways for your renewable crop to find new markets for generations to come.

The possibilities for cotton are limitless.

Cooking with cotton.

All-natural, zero-trans fat cottonseed cooking oil is just one example of how The Cotton Research & Promotion Program is discovering innovative ways for your renewable crop to find new markets for generations to come.

Many Americans regularly consume cottonseed oil, thanks to the product’s widespread, enthusiastic adoption by the combined $828.9 billion1 U.S. restaurant/foodservice and packaged food markets.

Cottonseed oil is safe as a food ingredient because gossypol, a toxin produced by cotton as a natural defense mechanism, is removed in the milling and refining process. To unlock the nutritive power of other cottonseed food applications, researchers continue to develop methods to reduce gossypol.

How much nutritive power? Texas A&M University researchers have estimated that if all cotton seeds were free of gossypol, the current global cotton output alone could produce enough protein for the daily needs of 500 million people.2

The possibilities for cotton are limitless.

Cottonseed based-meal for aquaculture.

High protein, high value cottonseed meal fed in shrimp farms is just one example of how The Cotton Research & Promotion Program is discovering innovative ways for your renewable crop to find new markets for generations to come.

Located halfway between the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific coast, and receiving only eight inches of annual rainfall, Las Cruces, New Mexico, doesn’t seem like a natural habitat for shrimp or cotton. But they are raised together here, and the shrimp are raised on a diet based largely on cottonseed.

In a research partnership with The Cotton Research & Promotion Program and New Mexico State University, the New Mexico Shrimp Company is raising shrimp on cottonseed for approximately one-eighth the cost of a traditional fish-meal diet.

Dairy cows have historically been the only commercially raised animals that could safely feed on cottonseed thanks to their metabolic immunity from gossypol, a toxin produced by cotton as a natural defense mechanism.

For the New Mexico program, the key to this problem came from Texas. Researchers from Texas A&M University, using modern biotechnology, found a way to block the production of gossypol in the seed, while maintaining normal levels in all other plant tissues, where it acts as a natural deterrent to predation. The amount of gossypol remaining in the seed is well below the limits set by FDA for food consumption.

While this cotton variety is still being commercialized, the economic potential is promising, given the market value of seafood by weight, compared with milk.

The possibilities for cotton are limitless.


1USA Food & Beverage Market Study. Global Strategy, Inc. on behalf of OSEC Business Network (2013).
2Rathore, Keerti S., et al. "Engineering cottonseed for use in human nutrition by tissue-specific reduction of toxic gossypol." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 48(2006):18054-18059.
3 Blaney, Don P. (June 2002). ”The Changing Landscape of U.S. Milk Production.” Statistical Bulletin Number 978, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Accessed 23 February 2016.
4Dairy Facts.” website of Purdue University Food Animal Education Network (2008). Accessed 23 February 2016.
5 “Raw Materials Used in the Manufacture of Commercial Mixed Feeds” American Hay, Flour and Feed Journal, (1909) 15:3. p 35-37.
6 Ely, L.O. and Guthrie, L.D. Feeding Whole Cottonseed to Dairy Cows and Replacements.Special Bulletin 59 (2008) University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.

The Blue Jeans Go Green™ Program: giving old denim new purpose.

By recycling worn denim into insulation, the Blue Jeans Go Green™ program keeps textile waste out of landfills and helps with building efforts in communities around the country.

Ever since Cotton Incorporated started the program in 2006, over one million pieces of denim have been diverted from landfills and over two million square feet of UltraTouch Denim Insulation has been generated. A portion of this insulation is distributed to communities in need each year.

Bonded Logic, Inc. (Chandler, Arizona), the manufacturer of UltraTouch Denim Insulation, has been on the leading edge of renewable building technology for 35 years. And its product engineers chose recycled cotton fiber as the basis for their patented formula because of its inherent qualities for sound absorption and maximum thermal performance.

It’s not surprising that, compared with traditional insulation products, cotton UltraTouch™ has no fiberglass itch and is easy to handle and work with. There are no chemical irritants, airborne particulates, VOC concerns and absolutely no need for carcinogenic warning labels.

As a cotton grower, you know about all the fungi and pests that are a threat to cotton, and so does Bonded Logic. UltraTouch contains an EPA registered fungal inhibitor to actively resist the growth of mold, fungi and bacteria.

This is how The Cotton Research & Promotion Program is finding innovative applications for your renewable crop while helping communities in need.

The possibilities for cotton are limitless.

Blue Jeans Go Green™ is a trademark of Cotton Incorporated.
UltraTouch™ Denim Insulation is a trademark of Bonded Logic, Inc.
*Insulation quantities related to the Blue Jeans Go Green™ denim recycling program may be adjusted each year

Bringing cotton comfort to disposable diapers and personal hygiene products.

You won’t have to search the fine print on a package of disposable diapers or feminine personal care products to see if it contains cotton. The manufacturer is likely to place the word “cotton” on the front of the package in large type. That’s because consumers agree on what’s important when purchasing these products, and cotton delivers.

For more than a decade, the market experts in The Cotton Research & Promotion Program have been integrating cotton into new sectors, positioning cotton in product categories long dominated by wood-pulp and synthetic materials. They have gone above and beyond product and market development to actively engage with brands and manufacturers at every level of their supply chains.

Today, cotton is preferred over other fibers for feminine hygiene products (pads, liners and tampons) by a 4 to 1 ratio7. Cotton continues to gain a larger share of the global disposable diaper market, which is expected to reach $59 billion by 20208. Even a modest share of growth in diapers can involve a great deal of cotton!

How the cotton is used in disposable diapers depends largely on the manufacturer’s market objectives. One manufacturer will prefer the cotton layer on the outside — for the caregiver’s appreciation — while another brand places it next to the wearer’s skin, or in between, within the thick absorption layer.

Clearly, consumers’ affection for cotton T-shirts, jeans and towels is transferring to these new product categories. Marketers don't need to build awareness. They simply need to tell the markets that there is cotton in a product!

These are just a few examples of how the Cotton Research & Promotion Program is discovering innovative ways for your renewable crop to find new markets for generations to come.

The possibilities for cotton are limitless.

Moisture-wicking fabrics.

Advanced technologies for cotton fabrics that wick moisture and repel water are just a few examples of how The Cotton Research & Promotion Program is discovering innovative ways for your renewable crop to find new markets for generations to come.

As consumers continue to incorporate more sports and fitness into their daily routines, the need to move from one activity to another without changing clothes is driving demand for new types of performance apparel, sometimes called “athleisure.” Cotton is proving to be a competitive — and dry — player in this field.

Developed by The Cotton Research & Promotion Program, TransDRY® technology for cotton is a high-performance moisture-management application that allows fabrics to wick* and spread perspiration as well as, or better than, most of the high-tech synthetic fabrics that previously dominated this expanding market.

Active people can now put aside polyester and enjoy the comfort and softness of their favorite cotton apparel with wicking and fast-drying performance.

The TransDRY® technology begins by treating cotton yarn with a special process to make it water-repellent, and blending the right amount of treated yarn with naturally absorbent cotton yarns. It works exactly like a French drain or irrigation system for carrying off the body’s own “standing water.” Fabric can be constructed to move moisture horizontally, vertically or from the skin side to the outside of a fabric.

Just a few of the iconic brands that have integrated our technology include Under Armour®, Eddie Bauer®, Gander Mountain®, Remington® 1816, 5.11 Tactical® and Element® (skateboarding). We never require our apparel partners to label their products with our technologies’ names, as long as they keep producing them with more of your cotton!

In addition to TransDRY®, The Cotton Research & Promotion Program has also successfully introduced high-performance finishes that move or repel moisture, including Wicking Windows, Storm Cotton and Storm Denim.

The possibilities for cotton are limitless.

*The term “wick,” for lifting perspiration away from skin, is borrowed from a much older “high-performance” cotton application: candle wicks, which similarly lift wax into the flame.
Wicking Windows, Storm Cotton and Storm Denim are trademarks and TransDRY® is a registered trademark of Cotton Incorporated.
Under Armour® is a trademark of Under Armour, Inc.
Eddie Bauer® is a registered trademark of Eddie Bauer Licensing Services LLC.
Gander Mountain® is a registered trademark of the Gander Mountain Company
1816 and Remington® are trademarks of the Remington Arms Company.
5.11 Tactical® is a registered trademark of 5.11, Inc.
Element® is a registered trademark of Billabong International Limited.
All other trademarks are acknowledged by their respective owners.

Water-repellent cotton and denim.

For decades, popular weather-resistant clothing was in the domain of nylon and polyester. In stormy weather, cotton was the comfort layer that needed protection from the elements. But today the finishing technology behind Storm Cotton and Storm Denim gives cotton apparel excellent repellency performance throughout the life of the garment.

Although it repels liquid, the finish still allows moisture vapor to pass through the fabric where it can dissipate into the environment. Since the Storm Cotton technology minimizes the amount of water the fabric will hold, garments dry much faster than untreated cotton, minimizing the amount of time and energy required for laundering.

Developed and marketed by The Cotton Research & Promotion Program, Storm Cotton and Storm Denim technology adds value and performance to many iconic apparel brands, including Cabela’s (Guidewear®, Roughneck lines), L.L. Bean (Katahdin Iron Works®), The North Face® (sweatshirts), Under Armour (Charged Cotton® Storm), 5.11 Tactical® (water repellent job shirt), as well as popular regional brands in Canada, East Asia, Europe, Australia and New Zealand.

As with our TransDRY® moisture-wicking technology, we never require our apparel partners to label their products with Storm Cotton or Storm Denim, as long as they keep producing them with more of your cotton!

The possibilities for cotton are limitless.

TransDRY®, Storm Cotton™ and Storm Denim™ are trademarks of Cotton Incorporated.
Under Armour® and Charged Cotton® are trademarks of Under Armour, Inc.
5.11 Tactical® is a registered trademark of 5.11, Inc.
Cabela’s®, Guidewear® and Roughneck™ are trademarks of Cabela’s Inc.
L.L. Bean™ and Katahdin Iron Works® are registered trademarks of L.L. Bean Inc.
The North Face® is a registered trademark of The North Face Apparel Corp.
All other trademarks are acknowledged by their respective owners.


7Nonwovens-Personal Care Products. Cotton Incorporated web site (2013). Accessed 23 February 2016.
8Shende, Swapnil. World Baby Diapers Market - Opportunities and Forecasts, 2013 - 2020. Allied Market Research. (November 2014)

Sometimes you don’t need a miracle. Just a little faith.

The U.S. cotton industry is a proud one, composed of passionate growers who recognize the limitless potential of one of America’s most cherished crops. Cotton producers, Larry McClendon of Marianna, Arkansas, and Patrick Johnson of Tunica, Mississippi, have seen industry trends come and go, commodity prices rise and fall.

Here, they share the importance of innovation in an ever-evolving market, and the role The Cotton Board plays in ensuring the future of their operations.


Patrick Johnson, at planting



Larry McClendon, at emergence



Larry McClendon, at harvest



Patrick Johnson, at harvest